Looking fine with Firefox 89

While we’re sitting here feeling a bit frumpy after a year with reduced activity, Firefox 89 has smartened up and brings with it a slimmed down, slightly more minimalist interface.

Along with this new look, we get some great styling features including a force-colors feature for media queries and better control over how fonts are displayed. The long awaited top-level await keyword for JavaScript modules is now enabled, as well as the PerformanceEventTiming interface, which is another addition to the performance suite of APIs: 89 really has been working out!

This blog post provides merely a set of highlights; for all the details, check out the following:

forced-colors media feature

The forced-colors CSS media feature detects if a user agent restricts the color palette used on a web page. For instance Windows has a High Contrast mode. If it’s turned on, using forced-colors: active within a CSS media query would apply the styles nested inside.

In this example we have a .button class that declares a box-shadow property, giving any HTML element using that class a nice drop-shadow.

If forced-colors mode is active, this shadow would not be rendered, so instead we’re declaring a border to make up for the shadow loss:

.button {
  border: 0;
  padding: 10px;
  box-shadow: -2px -2px 5px gray, 2px 2px 5px gray;
}

@media (forced-colors: active) {
  .button {
    /* Use a border instead, since box-shadow is forced to 'none' in forced-colors mode */
    border: 2px ButtonText solid;
  }
}

Better control for displayed fonts

Firefox 89 brings with it the line-gap-override, ascent-override and descent-override CSS properties. These allow developers more control over how fonts are displayed. The following snippet shows just how useful these properties are when using a local fallback font:

@font-face {
  font-family: web-font;
  src: url("<https://example.com/font.woff>");
}

@font-face {
  font-family: local-font;
  src: local(Local Font);
  ascent-override: 90%;
  descent-override: 110%;
  line-gap-override: 120%;
}

These new properties help to reduce layout shift when fonts are loading, as developers can better match the intricacies of a local font with a web font. They work alongside the size-adjust property which is currently behind a preference in Firefox 89.

Top-level await

If you’ve been writing JavaScript over the past few years you’ve more than likely become familiar with async functions. Now the await keyword, usually confined to use within an async function, has been given independence and allowed to go it alone. As long as it stays within modules that is.

In short, this means JavaScript modules that have child modules using top level await wait for that child to execute before they themselves run. All while not blocking other child modules from loading.

Here is a very small example of a module using the >a href=”https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Fetch_API”>Fetch API and specifying await within the export statement. Any modules that include this will wait for the fetch to resolve before running any code.

// fetch request
const colors = fetch('../data/colors.json')
  .then(response => response.json());

export default await colors;

PerformanceEventTiming

A new look can’t go unnoticed without mentioning performance. There’s a plethora of Performance APIs, which give developers granular power over their own bespoke performance tests. The PerformanceEventTiming interface is now available in Firefox 89 and provides timing information for a whole array of events. It adds yet another extremely useful feature for developers by cleverly giving information about when a user-triggered event starts and when it ends. A very welcome addition to the new release.

The post Looking fine with Firefox 89 appeared first on Mozilla Hacks – the Web developer blog.

Source: Mozilla Hacks

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*